Top Ten Countries to Live In

I scanned through several studies to bring to you, the ten best countried to live in. In what way are they the best? They are the ones that provide the healthiest work-life balance.

The OECD — the International Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, drew up a cmprehensive list of countries that offer the healthy and safe work and life balance.

Here are the top ten from there….

Number 10: France

  • Only 9 per cent of working people work very long hours, i.e., more than 50 hours a week.
  • Employement rate of women between the ages 25 to 54 years is well above the OECD average.
  • The study shows that there is enough quality time spent devoted to leisure, family and personal care.

Number 9: Portugal

  • Only 6 per cent of working people work very long hours, i.e., more than 50 hours a week.
  • High women employment rate.
  • There was much time spent on leisure and personal care.
  • Most families in Portugal were one child families

Number 8: Germany

  • Gender pay gaps were well above the OECD prescribed average.
  • Just 5 per cent of working people work very long hours, i.e., more than 50 hours a week.
  • Again, time spent on leisure and personal care was well above the prescribed norm.

Number 7: Sweden

  • People in Sweden spend 65 per cent of the day, i.e., about 15.5 hours in a day, on personal care (eating, sleeping, etc.) and leisure (socialising, entertaining, pursuing hobbies, etc.)
  • Only one per cent of working people work very long hours, i.e., more than 50 hours a week.
  • Women employement is high.

Number 6: Switzerland

* People in Switzerland work 1640 hours a year, lower than the OECD average of 1739 hours.

  • Only 6 per cent of working people work very long hours, i.e., more than 50 hours a week.
  • High rate of women employment.

Number 5: Belgium

  • People in Belgium work 1550 hours a year, one of the lowest rates.
  • Almost 16 hours a day are devoted to personal care and leisure.
  • only 4 per cent of the working people work long hours.

Number 4: Finland

  • As the report says, The Finnish model of work and family reconciliation stands out in international comparison because of the manner in which it provides choice to parents with young children. Finnish policy reduces barriers to employment by ensuring all families with young children have access to a subsidised childcare place.
  • Approximately, 15 + hours a day are spent on leisure and personal care.
  • High women employment rate.

Number 3: Netherlands

  • One of the lowest rates in OECD, people in Netherlands work for about 1378 hours a year.
  • In the past two decades, the rise in female employment in the Netherlands has been rapid.
  • Only one per cent of the working population work long hours.

Number 2: Norway

  • Only 3 per cent of the working people work longs hours.
  • Again, people in Norway work about 1407 hours a year — much much lower than the OECD’s prescribed norms.
  • The employment rate of women with children: 79 %

Number 1: Denmark

  • As per the OECD report, “Denmark ranks first in participation in childcare services and also boasts the lowest child-poverty rates.”
  • Only two percent of the working people work long hours.
  • The employment rate of women with children: 78%

A word about the OECD. It’s an International organisation with 34 member countries across Europe, Asia-Pacific, Northa nd South America.

So, the above study pertains only to those member countries. Nevertheless, it’s a good guide to decipher where we might want to live.

There we are! So, which country would you want to live in?

Watch this space. We will bring you tips on how to buy property in each of these countries — the dos and the don’ts.

Enjoy browsing for homes across the world,

Love

Milo

P.S: Coming up Next: Tips on and Process of buying property in France.

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